People's War

Veteran’s Day: Support our troops!

Support our troops! Happy Veteran’s Day!

Some articles of interest:
Question on the Indian Maoists – War is not a good thing, but it is an inevitable thing.
What is Protracted People’s War? – Revolutionary war is not the same as reactionary war.
Smedley Butler: Hero of the People – Veterans of imperialist war can come to the people.

People's Liberation Guerrilla Army in India

People’s Liberation Guerrilla Army in India

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People's War

Veteran’s Day: Support our troops!

Support our troops! Happy Veteran’s Day!

Some articles of interest:
Question on the Indian Maoists – War is not a good thing, but it is an inevitable thing.
What is Protracted People’s War? – Revolutionary war is not the same as reactionary war.
Smedley Butler: Hero of the People – Veterans of imperialist war can come to the people.

People's Liberation Guerrilla Army in India

People’s Liberation Guerrilla Army in India

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Political Work

Report from New York City Demonstration to support Dr. Saibaba and the Indian People

 

Under pouring rain, more than two dozen people from different political, student, and social organizations congregated on May 23, 2014 in front of the Indian Consulate in New York City to demonstrate their support for Dr. G.N. Saibaba, all political prisoners, and with the Indian people in their struggle against imperialism and fascism.

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The endorsers at the time of the demonstration, called by the Liaison Committee for a New Communist Party-NCP(LC) and maosoleum, included:

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New Communist Party (Liaison Committee)

FREE DR. SAIBABA AND SUPPORT THE NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC MOVEMENT OF INDIA!

New Communist Party - Liaison Committee

RALLY AT THE CONSULATE GENERAL OF INDIA

WHEN: May 23rd, at 5:00pm

WHERE: 3 E 64th st, NY, NY 10065

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The Liaison Committee for a New Communist Party – NCP(LC), strongly condemns the abduction and false charges against the leaders of the Revolutionary Democratic Front (RDF) in India, Dr. G.N. Saibaba and Jeevan Chandra. We are calling for a rally the Indian consulate in NYC, to support the demands of the RDF of India for the release of Dr. Saibaba and Jeevan Chandra, and stand in solidarity with the National Democratic Movement of India.

On May 9th 2014 the undercover Police of the Indian state of  Maharashtra Police abducted Dr. G.N. Saibaba – a leader of the Revolutionary Democratic Front (RDF) and a leading voice for the oppressed in India –  while he was returning home from work at the Daulat Ram College in Delhi University. Dr. Saibaba’s abduction included…

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Political Work

Free Dr. G.N. Saibaba!

 

G. N. Saibaba in 2010, courtesy of Masslijn.

Dr. G. N. Saibaba in 2010, courtesy of Masslijn.

 

The police in the Indian state of Maharashtra have abducted university professor and human rights activist Dr. G.N. Saibaba. Dr. Saibaba is a well known leader of the Revolutionary Democratic Front, and an esteemed academic.

In 2010, he was interviewed and explained the nature of his political activism:

What are the activities of the Revolutionary Democratic Front of India?

A. This front, as has been mentioned above, is a federation of revolutionary mass organizations working at grassroots level. While each of the constituent organizations works among the various sections of the people on their issues, to revolutionise them as per the understanding of New Democratic Revolution (NDR), the front focuses on larger political issues pertaining to all these sections at state and country-wide level. The RDF understands that NDR is the stage of democratizing the society by smashing the feudal and imperialist shackles. This also involves raising the consciousness of the people who are kept in backwardness by the semi-feudal, semi-colonial and reactionary social set-up that has emerged out of two hundred years of colonial rule and continuing imperialist plunder. The RDF believes that militant mobilization of basic classes of the people is the only way to democratize the South Asian Subcontinent. RDF also involves in building and participating in the larger United Fronts of different democratic and anti-imperialist forces in the country.

We join the call for his immediate and unconditional release and condemn the actions of the Indian State against the people. Some friends in India have started an online petition to this end, that reads in part:

 The police action against Saibaba is a matter of great criticism from all the human having moral values. By signing this petition we declare our solidarity with the illegal and arbitrary arrests of Dr. G.N. Saibaba and to show our solidarity in support of Dr. Saibaba and make all legal efforts to ensure his safe release.

Please sign and distribute this petition widely. Actions are being organized world wide in support of Dr. Saibaba, so please be on the lookout for them.

Free Dr. G.N. Saibaba! Stop the repression in India!

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People's War

What is Protracted People’s War?

longmarchmao

October 1, 1949 is the day of founding of the People’s Republic of China. On this day hundreds of millions of Chinese workers and peasants “rose up” to defeat the forces of reaction. The Chinese Revolution stands along with the Russian Revolution, as one of the single most important events to take place in human history. The example of Revolutionary China inspired the Black Panthers as well as our comrades waging People’s War in India, the Philippines, Peru and Nepal. This essay is in service to the memory of the Chinese Revolution. Taken as a whole, it represents the view of the Maosoleum collective.

No one barring the most chauvinistic Euro-Marxist dismisses Leninism and the Soviet Union out of hand for being solely applicable to the “Third World”. For all intents and purposes Russia in 1917 was a part of the “Third World”, with only 20% of the total population being in the industrial working class; 40% of that number working in large factories. The question then is posed why do many of the detractors of Maoism make this claim? Perhaps had Mao been from an “advanced capitalist nation” not only would Maoism been applicable to the First World but the Third World as well! This misunderstanding of Maoism is based on how Maoists make revolution, which is through Protracted People’s War and our view that it is universal. While we will discuss this erroneous view of Maoism one must also see an aspect of racism here as well. The dismissal of Maoism comes down ultimately to a fear that the First World Left has of actually learning something from Oppressed Peoples around the world. Sure our enlightened friends may know of Mao, perhaps even Kaypakkaya or even Gonzalo, but it is doubtful they have heard of Comrades Ganapathi, Azad or Kishenji. Let us discuss then what non-Maoists view then as the “correct” and universal method for making revolution, especially in the imperialist nations. The people’s army is a development of world historic relevance that has been copied even by the enemy, Mao is held in high regards amongst the U.S. military, even more so than Trotsky, who is also read.

On the October Road and the Distinction Between Leninism and Social-Democracy

The supposed “universal” method for revolution in the First World is actually the mechanical re-application of the Soviet method of revolution, namely the revolutionary insurrection;  or the so-called “October Road”. Prior to the 1917 Russian Revolution, and after the conclusion of the Paris Commune, Social-Democracy had emerged as a legalistic and open working class movement that had gained ground in parliaments all across Europe, their greatest success culminated in the creation of the first welfare state by Otto Von Bismark in Germany, who acted in response to pressure put on him by the Socialists. With the possibility of war on the horizon in Europe, the working class movement in Europe was faced with the consequences of decades of legalistic struggle under capitalism that came to a fever pitch at the Zimmerwald Conference in 1915. The Revolutionary faction known as the “Zimmerwald Left”, led by Vladimir Lenin, came out strongly against the opportunism of the time, which had instead of taking the position of opposing inter-imperialist war came out in support of their home countries under the guise of “revolutionary defencism”. Continue reading

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People's War

Is the Torch Passing? The Maoist Revolution in India

The Red Corridor

The Red Corridor

This article provides the most detailed analysis of the People’s War in India I could find. The People’s War in India  is the world’s largest revolution in the second most populous nation on Earth. The Communist Party of India (Maoist) and its military wing, the People’s Liberation Guerrilla Army dominate the Eastern half of the country known as the Red Corridor. If they succeed the Maoist forces would shake the foundations of the global imperialist system whose impact would be similar to the Russian and Chinese Revolutions. Although not known for the most part outside of India. It arguably constitutes the largest guerrilla army in the world today, with 20,000 PLGA cadres and 50,000 Maoist militias fighting a protracted people’s war in the countryside and jungles of India.Red Banner MLM

Does size matter?

The basic contradiction is this: in the very heartland of what is often referred to as the “world’s largest democracy” there is also occurring the “world’s largest revolution.” Revolutionary forces, led by the Communist Party of India (Maoist) and its military wing, the People’s Liberation Guerrilla Army,1 have an active presence in at least a third of the country, and dominate major and shifting swaths of territory, with control over several key regions where they have established their main liberated areas. Their goal is to overthrow the entire Indian political, economic and social system, and to replace it with a radical transformation of the class structure and new forms of popular democratization and development. They are raising an alternative vision for society, one that challenges bourgeois political and economic norms that are dominant across the global capitalist system led by the United States. Within this imperialist structure, India is viewed as a rising star of international capitalism for its rapid economic growth, largely driven by foreign investment, and its adherence to Western style democratic practices. But it is these very aspects of its society that are leaving hundreds of millions of Indians in ever greater poverty and despair, fueling their revolutionary upsurge and demands for new forms of democracy and development. The success of the Maoist revolution would not only transform India itself, therefore, but deliver a critical blow to the entire structure of imperialist capitalism, and to the political methods now used to maintain its global hold.

The issue of scale is relevant here. The constant references, at home and abroad, to the democratic processes in India as “large” are part of the justification offered, even by some on the left, for maintaining its current system. The size and the viability of its political institutions are seen as being closely linked. As the vice-chancellor of Delhi University put it in a poster urging participation in the parliamentary elections of 2009, “The largest democracy of the world is going to the polls to choose its representatives. Wider voter participation will strengthen democracy in India and will make it more vibrant.” But why does size matter? Is the issue of democracy in India and elsewhere in the world today primarily one of quantity or quality? In the United States, the democratic ideal is often the Greek city state or the small New England town where every citizen could participate directly in choosing leaders and making the decisions that affect them. But in a country of over one billion people such as India, is it important that democracy is “large”? In one sense, yes. The system of democratic parliamentarism, inherited from British colonialism, was the primary instrument used after Independence in 1947 to stitch together a modern national state out of many disparate elements. The sprawling nation, covering an entire subcontinent, and deeply divided by class, caste, ethnicity, religion and language, still depends largely on this political structure to keep its centrifugal forces from flying apart. Democracy is the critical national “glue.” But by the same token, the breakdown of the current Indian parliamentary democratic process, the approach of its historical limits, and above all its growing inability to meet the needs of hundreds of millions, bursts the bonds of bourgeois political practices inherited from the colonial past, and threatens the fragile unity of the nation and the “ungluing” of its social order.

Under such critical circumstances, the demand arises all the more insistently for an alternative system of national organization, and for forms of democracy adequate to this new historic stage. It is this path of revolution, linked to the democratic upsurge of the oppressed, that the CPI (Maoist) is now taking. Led by these self-defined “Maoists,” significant areas of India are today in armed revolt against the state. Here again the question of scale is relevant. Though hardly unique—there are revolutionary forces guided largely by Maoist principles in Nepal, the Philippines, and other countries as well—the Indian struggle is the most widespread such movement in the world, both in the extent of its territorial reach and the size of the population where it is active. A so-called “Red Corridor” at least partly under control of Maoists, now stretches some 750 by 300 miles through much of eastern and central India, while regions under their influence extend even further south and into more isolated pockets elsewhere.2 Up to 20,000 fighters in the PLGA, plus Maoist militia “estimated by several intelligence analysts at over 50,000,” with supporting political and cultural cadre, are active in 20 of 28 states, and one-third of the administrative districts.3 With the Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist)—which is independent from its Indian counterpart—now struggling internally to define its direction and a new role in national political power, after a decade-long guerrilla war, the territory where the forces of revolution are actively engaged reaches virtually unbroken from the Chinese border in Tibet deep into the south of the subcontinent. Success by the Maoists in India would constitute the largest revolutionary victory since the 1949 triumph of the Communists in China. Like that revolution, it would “shake the world.” Continue reading

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